Vagrant + Docker

Standardizing a development environment with Docker is challenging for a variety of reasons, the most common being that Docker simply is not the best of friends with Windows; particularly versions before Windows 10.

Regardless, when you’re running a modern development team with engineers and designers who have varying preferences of workstation, your environment needs to support them all.

In the past, we used Vagrant + Virtualbox + Ansible to build a virtual machine and we went from there. These days using Docker we can support an even deeper level of abstraction where you can run the environment natively, or in scenarios like Windows or on remote servers for demo purposes or what-not, we’ll run on a virtual machine or remote server.

All that to say we can now run docker+vagrant together to support this type of workflow. This way if you want to load up an environment on something where Docker isn’t supported well, you can run it through a virtual-machine with Vagrant, and otherwise just natively run docker-compose and be on your way.

First, our docker-compose:

Now, our Vagrantfile:

Third, we’ll want to abstract our configuration values to .env

Finally, application configuration

There will be things you’ll want to configure specific to your application and web-server to take this to the finish line, but if you’ve gotten this far, you know how to do the rest!

Rebase your database migrations to a single class file quickly

While developing, Doctrine Migrations can quickly become obsolete as you adjust your schema in the early stages of development. Nevertheless, Migrations are still a vital part of properly building compatibility for deployments. However, to consolidate and avoid having several (or in my case dozens) Migration Versions before you’ve got a stable schema, I’ve found it very useful to “rebase” my migrations to a single file.

I also try to keep my non entity driven schemas in a separate file, typically Version0.php. All of my recent development work has been on Symfony 2.7 so I have a modified sessions table I use for PDO session management (that’s a separate debate we can have later). This particular file I want to ignore when running this script so I’m left with two consolidated files for my entire schema:

And last but not least, this simply bash script calls upon a file config in the same source directory that has simple configuration values:

Usage

Simply run the bash script above and your Migrations files will be cleaned up entirely. You’ll of course want to rebuild your database as well so everything is in sync.

Symfony Tools

This is one script available in a collection of simple scripts I’ve written to help my development

https://github.com/litwicki/symfony-tools